Save Money Stay Cool During Louisville Summer

louisville gas electric kentucky utilitiesEnergy saving ideas from Louisville Gas & Electric (LGE) and Kentucky Utilities (KU) can help residents save money and keep cool this summer. Here are some expert tips:

  • Repair insulation and sealing air leaks
  • Place air conditioning units in shade
  • Keep electronics away from thermostat
  • Use fan to spread AC air throughout house
  • Adjust your home’s thermostat up two degrees in the summer
  • Use curtains to block sun’s rays during the day
  • Written by Bob Jones

Louisville Metro Council Votes 2% Increase on Natural Gas

Louisville Metro CouncilThe Courier-Journal reported that the Louisville Metro Council narrowly voted for a 2 percent fee to be paid by many Louisville Gas & Electric natural gas customers. The fee was proposed by Mayor Greg Fischer last month. The expected start date of the fee is December 1.

Residents of old Louisville and the unincorporated county will be expected to pay an additional $13 a year per household. The increase will generate about $3.6 million a year. Mayor Fischer plans to use this money to fund public safety improvements, most notably new police officers to keep city streets safe.

As expected, there is much debate over this issue. Some city leaders say the increase is needed because the money for public safety programs is “not there.” Louisville residents feel as though they are taxed enough and would like the programs to be paid with existing funds.

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Riverside Gardens Homes May Be Exposed to Toxic Chemicals

Moon-leeslandfillThe Louisville Courier-Journal is reporting that the EPA will be testing Riverside Gardens homes for toxic chemicals. Dangerous vapors from the Lees Lane hazardous waste landfill may be seeping into nearby homes.

Protecting Louisville, KY Environment

The sampling, which will start in late June, comes more than 15 years after the EPA first found problems with a methane-gas collection system that is also supposed to safeguard the Riverside Gardens neighborhood from chemical gases migrating from decades of buried waste.

Monitoring wells installed by the EPA last year found that methane no longer was a problem, but gas levels of seven other toxic chemicals were high enough to warrant testing homes. Contaminants of concern include Benzene, 1,3-butadiene, Carbon tetrachloride, Chloroform, Tetrachlorethylene, Trichloroethylene and Vinyl chloride.

It may take up to two months for test results to be returned.If necessary, the EPA will install remediation equipment.

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